Győr

-The temple of the community of Győr was the second largest Neologue synagogue in the country
-A mere 11-17 percent of the Jewish community of Győr survived the Holocaust
-The community so much reduced in number was unable to sustain the temple anymore and it was decaying for decades
-Following renovations in 2006, the building is now managed and maintained by the Széchenyi István University and the Győr Arts Museum
Details here. Video on the state of the building before the renovation here.

 

The Győr synagogue

The Győr synagogue

 

The first group of Jews settled on the estate of the Episcopate of Győr in 1791. Soon, the Jewish community built its synagogue on Győrsziget (Győr Island) with its signature twisted baroque style pillars. Before long this synagogue proved to be too small and the new synagogue was built in 1868-1870, which can still be seen today. The edifice was designed by Károly Benkó, an architect from Buda. The ground plan of the central hall is octagonal and the building is roofed by a dome; four squat towers with onion-shaped domes are attached to the four exterior walls. The Torah Ark covered with a flat roof and decorated with blue pillars is located along the Eastern side of the interior hall. The women’s section was placed along seven of the sides of the octagonal interior at the height of three floors. The interior decoration of the synagogue follows the ’historic’ style common at the time of construction, however the structural ironwork reflects the modern construction method of the late 19th century. Only some 500-800 people (11-17%) of the total Jewish population of 4500 survived the Holocaust. Although the building was more or less renovated after the war, the small Jewish community, decimated by the Holocaust was unable to maintain the synagogue. It was used as a furniture depot in the 1980s and following the fall of Communism, the building hosted cultural events, independent art programs. Finally in 2006 the synagogue was restored as a national monument. Currently it is used and maintained by the Széchenyi István University and the City Art Museum.